Pharmacokinetics of Orally Administered Prednisolone in Alpacas

Pharmacokinetics of Orally Administered Prednisolone in Alpacas

Principal investigator:

Ricardo Videla, DVM
University of Tennessee
9/15/2015–2/28/2017
$20,971

Alpacas and llamas are well recognized throughout the United States as an accepted livestock species. They are popular as pets, and also used for packing, fiber and as show animals. Unfortunately, there are no drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in South American camelids and pharmaceutical companies cannot economically justify seeking approval of drugs in this species. Glucocorticoids, such as prednisolone, are frequently used in human and veterinary medicine. Their anti-inflammatory properties make them a valuable asset in the treatment of autoimmune diseases and other conditions affecting the skin and nervous system. Glucocorticoids are known to have side effects in many domestic species such as increasing susceptibility to infection, abortion, and an elevation in liver enzymes. There are also anecdotal reports of side effects related to the use of glucocorticoids in camelids which has limited their use in this species. However, to date there are no studies evaluating the effects of glucocorticoids in alpacas. Dosage regimes are currently being extrapolated from other species but this does not guarantee the safety and efficacy of the treatment because of differences in metabolism. The purpose of this study is to determine the ability of alpacas to absorb and metabolize prednisolone and to evaluate their health during and after treatment. All the alpacas in the study will receive a dose of prednisolone by mouth once a day for five days. The health of the animals will be evaluated through bloodwork and daily physical exams.


Videla—Orally Administered Prednisolone